Vitralizado

HQ / Literatura

Neil Gaiman e as histórias de fantasmas

Gaiman

Em um evento paralelo ao Ted em Vancouver, o Neil Gaiman apresentou ontem um ensaio sobre histórias de fantasmas. O pessoal do Brain Pickings gravou alguns trechos da fala do escritor. Ele tenta explicar o que torna os enredos de terror tão populares. Seguem os áudios publicados no Brain Pickings e a transcrição da primeira fala (se alguém topar traduzir, é só postar nos comentários, que eu atualizo e dou o devido crédito):

Why tell ghost stories? Why read them or listen to them? Why take such pleasure in tales that have no purpose but, comfortably, to scare?

I don’t know. Not really. It goes way back. We have ghost stories from ancient Egypt, after all, ghost stories in the Bible, classical ghost stories from Rome (along with werewolves, cases of demonic possession and, of course, over and over, witches). We have been telling each other tales of otherness, of life beyond the grave, for a long time; stories that prickle the flesh and make the shadows deeper and, most important, remind us that we live, and that there is something special, something unique and remarkable about the state of being alive.

Fear is a wonderful thing, in small doses. You ride the ghost train into the darkness, knowing that eventually the doors will open and you will step out into the daylight once again. It’s always reassuring to know that you’re still here, still safe. That nothing strange has happened, not really. It’s good to be a child again, for a little while, and to fear — not governments, not regulations, not infidelities or accountants or distant wars, but ghosts and such things that don’t exist, and even if they do, can do nothing to hurt us.

And this time of year is best for a haunting, as even the most prosaic things cast the most disquieting shadows.

The things that haunt us can be tiny things: a Web page; a voicemail message; an article in a newspaper, perhaps, by an English writer, remembering Halloweens long gone and skeletal trees and winding lanes and darkness. An article containing fragments of ghost stories, and which, nonsensical although the idea has to be, nobody ever remembers reading but you, and which simply isn’t there the next time you go and look for it.

Deixe uma resposta

%d blogueiros gostam disto: